Claude's io/ 2002 ZR/ Built thread only...happy io!

208 replies [Last post]
Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #51
engine or wheel

Hum, I thought something was not adding up....I think that you are right... thanks, can't wait to get the next dyno result...

About the resonator, mine is now out, but as a warning, if I get water in my K&N pod filter, I will need a new engine..:( . I have gone that way because I am going to try to get a snorkel, and stay dry....

Happy io

singlecell
singlecell's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 06/07/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #52
.

Talking about snorkels, I am going to cut the hole in mine today to make one.  I have ordered some bits and peices to make one up, and I have a pod filter housing to install also, wish me luck!

ktm300
ktm300's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 20/08/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #53
I stand corrected.

 

  1. The camshaft upgrades in n/a form can take the car with tuning up as high as around 115 - 125 kw at the flywheel.
  2. The 4G94 SOHC engine at around 13 psi is good for around 200kw at the flywheel at the extreme. With forged components you can go up to as high as 250kw reasonably at around 20 psi boost as a good starting point.

Source:  http://www.rpw.com.au/shop/

 

Cheers.

 

 

"It should be assumed everything I say and do is incorrect ".

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #54
high flow exhaust

Singlecell, I have my finger crossed for the making of your snokel, good luck and have fun...

I just got my io back, with the new exhaust system. The first impression is that the car does rev much better and pick up better too.  It does make a much better noise, without being too loud, I didn't want people to turn around when I pass by!! So far, I am happy...

I will organise another dyno in the next few day....

Happy io.

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #55
high flow exhaust second dyno

Here it is, the dyno test after fitting the high flow exhaust.....

The green line is the best before: 57.4kw, the red one is the new one: 62.6kw. Again, I was wrong! and got more than 5kwsmiley(happy to be wrong)

In term of number it does not sound much: 5.2 kw but it is 9% better and it is a good gain (if you talk money 9% pay rise would be nice!!), and you do feel the difference. I have a very big gain in the higher rpm, but it won't be used much as I don't push my io that far very often (if ever). The gain in the early rpm is lower but again it is around 2kw or 4%, and again, you do feel it.

Another gain, is the noise...and it make me feel...a bit younger..for free..lol

These test were done with the same fuel (91) and it is only with the new exhaust and does not include the K&N filter or any other mod. I have done it to have a proper test instead of "it feel like..." and share with you all as well.

Next will be to change the tune up, and try to increase these result...stay tune!

Now, I am going to enjoy a beer, put the music a bit louder...and dance....lol

Edit: I have done a few thousand kilometer with this new exhaust and K&N filter, and I am very happy with it. This dyno test doesn't really give the right level of gain of power. The dyno is done at full throttle only and I think this is not where the most gain is. The petrol consumption is about the same,  and the noise....beautiful!!!!

Happy io. you bet!

NZIO
NZIO's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 07/08/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #56
Crikey

Thats a bigger gain than I would have guessed at - you must be well chuffed. So when you say this is without the K&N do you mean you put the original filter back for both runs, or were both done with the K&N?

Would be nice to find a way to get this kind of gain in lower end torque....

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #57
Dyno

Sorry, what I try to say it that the only difference between the 2 dyno is the new exhaust and nothing else. The K&N filter was fitted before the first test and did stay on.

I think that it is fair to say that the new exhaust and the K&N filter did add at least 10% (9% for the exhaust, and minimum 1% for the filter) probably a bit more.

Happy io

singlecell
singlecell's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 06/07/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #58
.

Claude do you know what they did to the exhuast? Was it a cat back or did they replace the entire thing?

PININ_me
PININ_me's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 13/03/2012
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #59
What exhaust did you put

What exhaust did you put on???

Any pictures, make etc.. so we can all have a go? cheeky

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #60
New exhaust

At first I only wanted to replace the manifold by extractors, but  I was advised to replace everything in order to have the full advantage of the new extractors. So this is what I did, replaced everything. The only supplier I found for the extractors were Wildcat, I would have preferred one from Pacemaker, but no luck there. I got the wildcat from ebay. I contacted the maker of wilcat extractors to make sure that this seller was selling the real thing, and they confirm that he was all legit.

I have to fit a heat shield on the extractors, and I will post a more complete post, with some pictures of the new system, sometime next week.

Happy io

fordem
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 19/06/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #61
Don't wait too long with that heat shield.

There's quite a bit of stuff under there that you run the risk of damaging - the screen washer bottle for one - I was fooling around with an IR thermometer a couple of days back, whilst running the GDI ECU relearning routine, and the stock manifold gets hot enough to push the thermometer into overload (>500F), and that's with the engine idling and the hood open.

PININ_me
PININ_me's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 13/03/2012
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #62
Do you hve a link??

Do you hve a link??

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #63
wildcat extractors ebay link

Yes, here it is, http://cgi.ebay.com.au/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=170789512629 These are for the 2.0 litres engine, I don't know if they are the correct fitting for the other engine.

Thanks Fordem, yes the heat shield is going to be fitted Tuesday (I already removed the washer bottle!!).

Happy io

PININ_me
PININ_me's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 13/03/2012
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #64
Thanks for that - ill have a

Thanks for that - ill have a look for something myself that's either here or posts to the uk. Which exhaust did you use? ie from the extractor/ manifold itself. Is it de-catted ?  Cos im looking for a straight through system rather than the original backbox than is already on there.

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #65
high flow exhaust

No, it does still have the a cat converter, but everything is new, high flow, mandrel bent, and legal!.  If you can't find an already made extractors to fit your engine (1.8?) a good exhaust shop should be able to build one (a bit more $). I have asked on the forum what size tube to use, 2 inch or bigger, and the 2 inch was a favorite.

I wouldn't re used the old cat, because it is not a high flow one, and with age they may become dirty and have some blockage, and waste the extractors. This said, I was told that the extractors by themselves do make a good part of the increase in power/torque

I shopped around to find someone that know what he is doing, and his advice was that the 2 inch would give some increase in power/torque from early rpm and more at higher rpm, a bigger tube would be only at higher rpm. I don't have much knowledge on exhaust, but I got told that if you fit an exhaust that is too big for the engine, the engine have to work harder to push the fume out.

On Tuesday the car will go back to get the heat shield fitted, and I will ask him to put the car on the hoist to take some pictures.

Happy io

PININ_me
PININ_me's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 13/03/2012
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #66
That'd be great if you could

That'd be great if you could get some pics, so i know what i should be aiming at, and to have a look to see your exhaust from manifold to back box.

Yeah mine's the 1.8 - so a 2" diametre is the one to look for?!?!

Powatone (not verified)
  • Online Status:
  • Post Number: #67
Custom made exhaust system

Claude asked me if I could put some info and photos of our work up for other members to see:

The extractors as claude said were Wildcats the rest of the system is custom made 2" mandrel bend system with maximum ground clearance, heavy duty hangers and rubbers for offroad driving.

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.413856515325707.93217.294850097...

Video:

.be

 

Edit After a few thousand kms the noise is now much deeper...it is great ....

 

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #68
Powatone Canberra Fyswick

This is what I call the ultimate customer service yes

Happy io.

fordem
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 19/06/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #69
That's nice work.

Looks like a well put together system, and the back box is so much smaller than the stock one.

singlecell
singlecell's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 06/07/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #70
.

Yeah that looks flash as (and pricey), no one in Rockhampton can do mandrel bending so I cant get anything that pretty. But a standard bent one probably wont be that big of issue for our cars.

On a side not, your exhaust sounds like my snorkel when I am accelerating hard.

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #71
Heat shield picture

This is the extractors with the heat shield installed. That aluminium "waffle" is very efficient, you can put your hand on it (without any burn, that is!)

Happy io

fordem
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 19/06/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #72
Can't be certain from that picture

Is there space for the screen washer bottle there?

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #73
washer bottle

Yes, I hope! on this model the bottle goes, mainly,on the top of the bearing plate of the strut.

Happy io

fordem
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 19/06/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #74
Wow

Mine has it under the air filter housing, sort of right alongside the exhaust - which is why I mentioned that it might be affected by the heat.

I have an unrelated question for you - is your transmission cross member original ?  The pictures show a rectangular cross member running straight across, whilst the one on my car is a round tube with a lower center section.

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #75
Cross menber

The lower section of the bottle goes closer to the extractors, but should not be a problem, I might put a picture of it later one, Yes it is the original cross member, I didn't spot the difference before.

Happy io.

NZIO
NZIO's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 07/08/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #76
Cross member

Mine is also round with a dip in the middle - I think significantly lower to the ground than this square one. What year is yours Fordem - perhaps this was something changed for the later cars.

fordem
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 19/06/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #77
Mine's a very early model

July 1998

NZIO
NZIO's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 07/08/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #78
Model change then

Mine's a 1999 so I guess this was an early change they made - I wonder why. It might have been to improve ground clearance as I have had to be winched along after getting got hung up on it a couple of times on the brow of deeply rutted tracks.

bob_oz
bob_oz's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 31/03/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #79
crossmember change

NZIO wrote:

Mine's a 1999 so I guess this was an early change they made - I wonder why. It might have been to improve ground clearance as I have had to be winched along after getting got hung up on it a couple of times on the brow of deeply rutted tracks.

 

yes - all new model Io's have the square crosmember, all old ones have the round tube one - same as the struts

.

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #80
Nearly 10 000km with the 225/75/16 km2

I just wanted to give a feedback on these bfg km2. I got these tyres because every time I have been in trouble, mud was always close by! to improve the 4wd of my io and get a small lift without playing with the angle. (I don't really need much more lift)

This size have chew a bit on the power, but nothing extreme. The sidewall is excellent and they are a 8 ply rating, so they should be very good against puncture but they are a bit heavier.  Because of the ply rating and the io is light, I can drop the pressure a bit lower, around 18 psi for normal 4x4 but could go around 12/13 psi if needed, 32 psi on road, higher and the car start wandering (36/38psi) and the rear start to "bounce" too. The tyres are very good on dirt road, steep climbing, mud and good on dry road...haven't try sand.. The bigger downside is the grip on yet road, especially if the car stay in rear wheel drive only, I drive in "all wheel drive" and it is good. Noise wise, they are very acceptable, I got a bit worried after I rotate them as they become a bit more noisy (swap was: front crossed, then on the back; back straight , then on the front) but it came back good after around a couple of fuel tank. The difference between the A/T (different size) I used to have is very noticeable, much better grip on dirt road and better in 4x4 in general. This doesn't make the A/T a bad tyre at all, it is just more a medium between road and 4wd. As I mentioned before, this size did make my car wandering at higher speed and a bit scary while doing fast lane change (again,at higher speed only), the wandering is no longer a problem with the Kmac adjustable top plate (see above) but I stay careful while fast changing lane! (not that bad).

I wanted to do this feedback, because this tyre is often seen as one of the best (I said, one of, and not the best!! so don't shoot me here!!) but it come with some downside that anyone thinking of getting them should be aware of.

All said, I am still very happy with them....

Happy io

Edit. Those tyre are great, the sidewall is a bit firm. The car drive much better with the kingspring. Keeping your original suspension is just ok (if not worn out) but new strut with the kingspring is a better set up. 

 

fordem
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 19/06/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #81
Try dropping the "onroad" pressures some

Recommended pressure for a 215 tire on one of these vehicles is around 26 psi, a 225 (same weight supported by a larger surface area) will take less, and even more so it's an LT tire (stiffer sidewalls) - your 32~34 psi is too high.  Reduce it some & see how she responds - you may find the rear end a little more co-operative in the wet.

There are a couple of different ways to determine the optimum tire pressure ...

First method, which I like to use, is done with chalk and can only be done on road - mark a broad chalk line across the tire tread and then drive a short distance in a straight line and then examine the chalk mark - if it's rubbed away evenly, your pressures are good, if the center is rubbed away more than the edges, the pressure is too high, if the edges are rubbed away more than the center, the pressure is too low, if one edge is rubbed away more than the other, you have a camber issue.

There's a variation on this first method that I've seen used on race circuits - measuring the tire temperatures across the tread - hotter in the center, too hard, hotter near the edges, too soft.

The second method is known as the 4psi method - I got this from 4WD Action - pick whatever pressure you're comfortable with and set your tires with them cold - drive for an hour and then check the pressures again - the pressure this time should be 4psi approximately over the cold pressure - if the variation is more than 4 psi, you're starting too low, if the variation is less than 4 psi, you're starting too high - adjust your starting pressures accordingly & repeat.  As you can see the 4psi method can be quite time consuming to determine the correct pressure, however, it is claimed that this is the only method that works in all terrain.

 

 

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #82
tyre pressure

Thanks Fordem, Since I have the ARB compressor in the car, I can play with the pressure a bit more. It took me some time to be happy with the 32psi pressure, I have try different setting, lots under the rain!!. I have try the method you mentioned from 4wd action, but with 3psi instead of 4 psi. This method is only valid for on road and not for all terrain as the tyres can warm up more on dirt road, especially road tyre or M+S, I have seen rise of 10 psi!!, 22psi before hitting the track and got a reading of 32psi when I wanted the pump up his tyres back for the road on the end of the day.

This said, I agree that 32/34 psi is on the high side, but that my preference. It is easy enough for every one to try different pressure. I found that the advised tyre pressure on the tyre sticker to be nearly always too low.

In general, M/T tyres are at they worst on yet road and icy road and this is the main thing I wanted other to be aware of.

I drive in "all wheel drive" or 4H in you prefer, on wet road, and it is acceptable, still always with care!

I vaguely remember hearing of the chalk test while at school, I didn't know that it was still used....I don't think that it is very precise...but I don't know.

Happy io

 

singlecell
singlecell's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 06/07/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #83
.

I am pretty sure those pressures are what are recommended for a smooth ride in the car itself.  From my understanding of it all, to get longer life from your tyres you have to run them at higher psi.  I am told that my geoloanders will only last the advertised kilometers if you run them at 40psi.  Now the car is rough as hell at 40 psi so I always drop it down lower.  But my brother who works at a tire shop is always up me about it becaues to him tire life is more important then car comfort.

fordem
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 19/06/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #84
Tire pressures are a compromise

There's really only one advantage to higher pressure - reduced fuel consumption - the disadvantages are a rougher ride, reduced grip and contrary to what your brother claims - reduced tire life.

 Higher than optimum pressures cause the tire to "crown" - the carcass baloons, pushing the center of the tread "proud" of the edges, and this results in the center of the tread wearing faster than the two outer edges.  It reduces the life of the tire, and because there is less tread in contact with the road, it also reduces adhesion.

Lower than optimum pressures causes the reverse, the carcass collapses inwards, the edges of the tread wear faster, thereby reducing the life of the tire and again compromising adhesion.

Lower pressures are inherently more dangerous than high, and they also increase drag and fuel consumption - the danger lies in the fact that as the sidewalls flex more, the tires heat internally and this can cause a failure - if you've ever experienced a high speed blow out, then you know how dangerous it can be, if you haven't - well I hope it never happens to you, trust me, it is NOT a pleasant experience.

When we move away from the vehicle manufacturer's recommended tire size, the vehicle manufacturer's recommended pressures are no longer correct - wider tires support can more weight for the same inflation pressures, tires with more plies in the sidewall can support more weight for the same inflation pressures - the vehicle manufacturer's recommendation now becomes a guideline or starting point for experimentation - and the chalk method is a simple & convenient way to determine the optimum pressure.

singlecell
singlecell's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 06/07/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #85
.

I agree with everything stated there, what I am saying is that I am told that 40psi is the optimal pressure for my tires to not wear them out faster then I should be. Infact he points out the wear I am getting from running them lower.

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #86
tyre pressure

He he!! We are all saying the same thing, on different level.

While it is true that higher pressure get the ride a bit hard, and it does wear more the middle of the tyre, but this is the 1/2 empty glass!! because while wearing more the middle of the tyre, it does wear less the outer edges of the tyre! The outer edges can wear out  quicker than the middle, and adjusting the pressure can compensate for that (ask any tyre fitter!).  With my 215/70/16 A/T I use to have them at 40 psi to go to longer drive, nice and straight road, and 32 psi  on not so nice road (40psi, would get the car jumping a bit! at every bump), by doing so I had a very nice flat wear, and saved my outer edge for 4wd. Yes too high pressure can blow out a tyre, and this does happen because the driver is not doing the right thing, for example: having a heavy loaded big 4x4 with low pressure because doing some low speed 4x4 at 20psi or so, and hit the road without adjusting the pressure (laziness) back to normal and driving at 130 km/h, and not having a light truck construction tyre or worse...a retread!!

As an advice, I think that if someone is not sure about what pressure to use, everything above is true! (I never done the chalk test!) try different setting, but start with 26psi for a few day, then try 38psi, you will feel the difference and understand a bit better.(don't try 30psi, then 32 psi as the difference is very very small)

Then try the same on the dirt road (start with 32psi, then 22psi). I guaranty you will get it! and stay away from extreme (it is not because the maximum tyre pressure is 55psi that 50 psi is going to be good)

You must understand that driving a 4wd, you will have to adjust the pressure depending where you drive.

All tyres are a bit different, all car are a bit different and mostly, all driver are a bit different!

Happy io.

RSR
RSR's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 02/02/2012
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #87
Tread Depth Gauge

I have always used a tread depth gauge to measure the depth of the tread across the width of the tyre, I have used this with all types of tyres on all types of vehicles (4WD to high performance) and this has been by far the most accurate indicator of incorrect pressures. 

The tread depth gauge will cost around $5.00 - $10.00 and after the initial monitoring of the tread depth for a week or two and preasure adjustments to compensate for the wear indicated you will have the optimum pressure for on road, after that if you check it every so often (service intervals etc) you can maximise the life of you tyres by keeping the wear as even as possible which also improves safety by ensuring the tyre has the maximum surface area contact with the road.

fordem
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 19/06/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #88
One disadvantage.

RSR wrote:

I have always used a tread depth gauge to measure the depth of the tread across the width of the tyre, I have used this with all types of tyres on all types of vehicles (4WD to high performance) and this has been by far the most accurate indicator of incorrect pressures. 

The tread depth gauge will cost around $5.00 - $10.00 and after the initial monitoring of the tread depth for a week or two and preasure adjustments to compensate for the wear indicated you will have the optimum pressure for on road, after that if you check it every so often (service intervals etc) you can maximise the life of you tyres by keeping the wear as even as possible which also improves safety by ensuring the tyre has the maximum surface area contact with the road.

There's one disadvantage to this method - the time it takes - you're talking a week or two, between adjustments, potentially months to get your pressures correctly set - the same results can be obtained in a lot less time, as suggested previously by using chalk.

The principles are the same, your method is dependent on the tread rubber being worn away, mine depends on chalk being wiped away.

fordem
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 19/06/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #89
40 psi is too high

Waaaaay too high.

What tires are you using?  Make, model & size?  What's the weight of the vehicle?

A quick mathematical way to get a starting point is to first determine the maximum load capacity of the tire, which will be stated at a given pressure - you get this from the tire manufacturer - divide the weight of the vehicle by 4 (there are 4 wheels supporting the vehicle), divide that by the maximum load of the tire and then multiply that by the maximum pressure of the tire.

Please note - this is a very crude calculation, and does not take into consideration the weight distribution of the vehicle, if you're going to use it to determine the pressures for, just for example a loaded truck, you will need to determine what proportion of the truck's weight is supported by which axle - I am using it here only to show that 40 psi is way over the optimum pressure for an iO on standard sized tires. 

A Yokohama Geolandar AT in a 215/70R16 is rated to take 1764 lbs at 51 psi (cold) - I chose 215/70R16 because it's the stock size, as marked on the tire placard of my Pajero iO which weighs has a GVM of 1790kg or 3946 lbs.

3946/4 = 986lbs, 986/1764 x 51 = 28 psi

28 psi is my starting point - the vehicle manufacturers recommended tire pressure, as stated on my tire placard is 1.8 kgf/cm which translates to 26 psi

Apparently Austrailian market iOs had 215/65R16 tires as standard - a Geolandar AT in that size is rated at 1653 lbs @ 51 psi - a three door has a GVM of 1610 kg or 3549 lbs, 3549/4 = 887 lbs, 887/1653 x 51 = 27psi

I'm sorry I don't know where your brother gets his numbers from, but 40 psi is too high for an iO on stock tires.

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #90
Way too high??

Hummm...again you are saying the same thing:) Your comment is a bit harsh and true (we are kind of used to that:)) in a way that 40 psi is on the high side for as you wrote "too high for an io on stock tires"  but Singlecells does not have stock tyres! or even rims! he does have, if I am correct, 225/65/17  yoko geolandar and I think that these tyres have a softer rubber than average and I wouldn't be surprise that 26psi would kill the outside edges of them pretty quickly, hence the 40psi advised by his brother.  I might push the guessing  as what his brother showed him on the tyres, could it be a darker black color with a kind of triangular shape, maybe some feathering on the outside edges?

Again, I could be wrong...been there...done that...ask my wife...

Happy io.

fordem
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 19/06/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #91
And that...

is the reason why I asked what tire(s) he was using.

I'll take a look at the 225/65R17 Geolandars later this evening, but I'll bet they have a higher load capacity and will take a lower pressure.

ktm300
ktm300's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 20/08/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #92
I'll stir the pot.

I was told years ago.

36, 26, 16.

Road, dirt, sand.

I have 4 staun deflators.

2 set @ 26 & 2 @ 16.

Simple!

 

 

 

"It should be assumed everything I say and do is incorrect ".

fordem
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 19/06/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #93
Ok - I'll bite ...

What vehicle and tire were you told that for?

bob_oz
bob_oz's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 31/03/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #94
psi

strangly the tyre plackard seems to give me the best running

26psi ish all round, any harder and they slide when pushed sideways, softer and it walks too much when drifting.
20psi on steep climbs
18psi on sand seems to work well

.

ktm300
ktm300's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 20/08/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #95
.

None specifically.

It's what you might call a rule of thumb.

Try it.

I'm sure on most vehicles, for most people, in most situations you'll find it works.

Obviously I'm not talking prime movers here.

 

 

Edit. Maybe this should be moved to the 'What pressure do you run' topic.

 

"It should be assumed everything I say and do is incorrect ".

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #96
replacement of missing bumper plate

I had enough of seeing that hole in my bumper, where most of us lost this plate under the number plate. I have a few bit of 3 mm aluminium checker plate, so I have made a replacement, and I think that it does look ok....much better than having nothing...

One advice if you go ahead and make one, cut the plate to suit the width, much longer, bent it in the middle ( I used a press, and a 70 mm round pipe), then ( and only then!) cut the height. It is easier than cut the plate to size and then bend it as the cut is in the bent part (I hope I make sense!). To bend it to the best possible angle, I used a small strip of aluminium as a guide. I used some small rubber block in each corner (same as the one found under some small appliance, or kitchen's door stop) to have the new plate not too much in. I put a strip of rubber foam to have a better fit between the both plates, vibration free! (hopefully!), and 2 large rivets. I hope that it will stay on!!

It could be made out of other material and be painted too....

Happy io

Edit, this never moved and look great (to me anyway!)

Some details

fordem
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 19/06/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #97
Ummm - Claude?

How do you remove the plate if you need to get access to the frame hook?  For example, if you need to recover a Hilux (we all know iO's don't need to be recovered - they never get bogged).

Claude io
Claude io's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 11/10/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #98
frame hook

HO NO!! they do get bog!! but true for the access, but you can weld some nuts on the back plate instead of rivets. The hook have been removed when fitting the tow bar.

Happy io

singlecell
singlecell's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 06/07/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #99
.

I am with you Fordem, I am pretty sure an IO cant get bogged.  Claude must have a faulty one, haha.

bob_oz
bob_oz's picture
  • Online Status: Offline
  • Joined: 31/03/2011
  • Posts:
  • Post Number: #100
put it back in!!!

Claud io wrote:

HO NO!! they do get bog!! but true for the access, but you can weld some nuts on the back plate instead of rivets. The hook have been removed when fitting the tow bar.

Happy io

 

man - that hook is a tough mother! I'd be putting it back in and bolting your towbar through it wherever you can. - no way that hook would EVER pull out or twist the back end with a towbar fitted to spread the load across between the rails.

I've dragged really massive logs with the hook no worries, i'd feel totally comfotable with someone really yanking on it if need be. (half log visible in pic)

.

Syndicate

Syndicate content

Translate This Site Into Your Language