Fordem's iO

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fordem
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High Mileage Oil.

Most oil companies have an oil specially formulated for older cars with high mileage engines - a high detergent oil, to help clean up the sludge that may have built up, and special seal conditioner additives to combat leaking seals

A few years back the only "High Mileage" oil available locally was a ridiculously thick (something like 25W70) Castrol product, but things have changed, and in January, when I discovered that my local lube shop had Valvoline 10W40 High Mileage oil, I decided to give it a try, starting as a top up to replenish lost oil -  the first week, I went through the usual quart; second week, another quart; third week, half a quart, today is the end of the fourth week - less than half a quart, and the spots on the driveway are noticeably smaller.

The next oil change is due in early March, and if the reducing consumption trend continues I will switch to a "fresh fill" of the high mileage oil - it's a little more expensive (around 25% more), but, it looks like it could reduce the consumption enough to pay for itself, and possibly allow me to leave the engine alone for awhile longer - it's my understanding that I have to continue using the oil, or the leaks will reappear, but I think I can live with that.

Claude io
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oil

Good to know, I have seen these oil but never tried them and thought that they were just a bit thicker and more an advertising thing than the real stuff...

Happy io

fordem
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The "lift project" is well and truly committed.

After many months of deliberation I guess you could say I am now committed to lifting my iO - I've just ordered front & rear Dobinson springs from Dobinson USA - the actual lift is still some months away as the springs have to be shipped from Australia to the US, and then from the US to Guyana - yes - I could have shipped directly from Australia to Guyana, but, it's a lot less expensive to do it this way.  A pair of the high pan KYB 334405 struts has been purchased and the piston rods from the OE Mitsubishi struts have been dropped off at the machine shop to be converted into strut extenders, camber bolts are also sitting on the shelf in case they are needed.

fordem
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Wish me luck!!

With my son in New York for a few weeks, my iO is temporarily "unneeded" - it's just my wife & I and we have two cars besides the iO - so I decided to take the opportunity to fix the "oil leak from hell".

It took us three full days to get the engine out and on to the stand - Mitsubishi did not make this vehicle "mechanic friendly" - you have to unbolt the torque converter entirely by feel, the intake has to be removed, before the starter can be removed, before the bell housing can be unbolted - and the list goes on...

Enough negatives - there were no unpleasant surprises when we dropped the oil pan - the oil pump has been removed, and sure enough the O-ring behind it was as hard as a rock - it looked like a thick metal washer and actually broke when I tried to flex it.  Tthe bottom end of the engine has been cleaned up and reassembled, and tomorrow we tackle the top end.

Claude io
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engine repair

Good luck, I hope you get good result.

Happy io

fordem
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Car is back together ...

I pick it up from the mechanic in the morning.

We've replaced all the various oil seals (front & rear crank and cam seals) and O-rings (oil pump - this is where the leak was - cam position sensor, GDI pump) - all of the smaller coolant hoses have been replaced, including the one that runs behind the cylinder head, the EGR port has been blanked and everything has been given a thorough cleaning - I tell you this engine has not been this clean in all the time I've owned this car.

We opted not to pull the head, so the valve seals have not been touched - when the exhaust manifold was removed there was a heavy - almost 6mm - build up of carbon in the #2 exhaust port suggesting that there maybe a problem with the oil rings in that cylinder, and since the engine runs reasonably well I decided to let well alone for now - the strange thing about the build-up is that it was in the form of a ridge right where the head meets the manifold and the actual port itself and the valves were fairly clean - I'm curious as to why the build up and even more so as to why it took the form that it did - but not curious enough to actually tear it part knowing that the parts to do a proper rebuild are not readily available.

One of the things that has concerned me about this car is the relatively small "oil pan" capacity - it takes just about four litres of oil as compared to, for example, the six litres that my 2.0 litre Grand Vitara takes - something which my mechanic also commented on.  Now one of the things I've noticed is that if the car is on the slightest of slopes it has a noticeable impact on the level shown on the dipstick, and this has been a concern because it would theoretically be possible, if the oil were just slightly low, and the vehicle were on a slope (which is not unusual when off road), for the level to fall even lower - whilst disassembling the engine we were discussing the possibility of increasing the pan capacity by welding in a section and lowering the pickup - what we discovered is that there is quite a bit of "unused capacity" in the existing pan - there is quite a bit of clearance between the crank and where the level would be at the full mark on the stick - enough to safely "overfill" the pan by another litre or two (my mechanic thinks it can take another gallon - I would be happy with half that).

The car will be parked for about a week after I bring it home tomorrow, as I have to go on a trip, but I'll be using it daily once I get back and will report more then.

Future work that I hope to get done this month - installation of new speakers in the front doors - which shouldn't take long, and the installation of a transmission temperature gauge - this one requires the pan to be removed and a bung welded in for the gauge sender so it involves the car being off the road for a day or so.

Claude io
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well done

What I noticed on the spare engine I had (not GDI) is that the exhaust manifold doesn't fully match the head outlet, this could explain why a deposit will develop there.

Well done, I hope that you will have good result....

Happy io

fordem
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There is some degree of mismatch by design.

If I remember correctly, it is common practice to have the manifold port a tiny bit larger that the port in the head - say about 1mm all around - it's done to prevent "reversion" and boosts low end torque - it's just very strange.

Anyway - I've picked up the car - starts & runs well, and that "customary" film of oil on the front of the oil pan is not there, so we're looking good.

simmo777
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Good News!

That's good news to hear Fordem! Glad everything seems to have turned out okay. Interesting point about the oil pan. Would hate to think all the angles driving combined with hard off road with the oil moving around and possibly not lubricating everything would be reducing the engine life noticeably.

2002 5dr Pajero IO QA 2.0L Auto - Lifted, Locked!! 1.925 Low Range - Muddies (205/80/16) - Redback Extractors to 200cell cat to dump at diff Exhaust 

Claude io
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oil pan

simmo777 wrote:

That's good news to hear Fordem! Glad everything seems to have turned out okay. Interesting point about the oil pan. Would hate to think all the angles driving combined with hard off road with the oil moving around and possibly not lubricating everything would be reducing the engine life noticeably.

Maybe the GDI oil pan is different than ours, my io have seen some pretty long steep hills, maybe not Simmo (lol), and I never have any engine problem or heard of them related to this.

Happy io

fordem
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The pans appear to be different ...

Looking at the shop manual, the SOHC engines use a conventional pan with a baffle or windage tray that would keep the oil around the pickup, the DOHC MPI engine uses a different pan, also with a windage tray, and for the DOHC GDI engines, there are two more pans, neither of which have the tray - I have no idea why Mitsubishi would have gone this route.

fordem
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Strut extenders are finally complete...

I got a phone call from the machine shop guy this morning - after many months he has finally gotten around to working on my strut extenders - basically taking the top of the strut rods from a pair of OEM Mitsubishi struts, cutting them to length and then drilling & tapping them to screw onto one another - or the top of new strut rods - and I was able to pick them up after lunch.

The local KYB dealer also has the KYB 343408 rear shocks in stock (just in case I decide to toss the Monroes that I currently have), so the only things missing for the lift are the Dobinsons springs, which have been ordered and which I hope to have soon.

fordem
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I received good news this weekend...

My Dobinson's springs have finally landed in Miami - they should get to my sister within the next few days and then it's onto Guyana - if all goes well I will have them in mid August and then I have to find the time to install - fitting the rears is the easy part, the fronts - well - I have a number of "iterations" planned.

First - I think should be the low pan struts with the Dobinsons springs and no strut extenders - see how much lift I get and also how much droop, and get an idea of what the ride is like.

Second - if I'm happy with the ride - will be the Dobinsons springs with the high pan struts - whether or not the strut extenders get fitted at this point will depend on the lift & droop measurements obtained in the first iteration.  If I'm not happy with the ride, I might try the OE low pan springs with the high pan struts.

The general idea is to do a mild lift to get more clearance for larger tyres, the high pan struts will be fitted and the lift matched front & rear, and also improve the ride some - the stiffer springs should reduce the body roll and also the dive when braking.  The Dobinsons are advertised as 30~35mm lift, but depending on the struts that could end up being closer to 55 mm, we might need a spacer at the rear to even it out, but we could also go the other way and swap out the Dobinsons front coils for one with a lower rate, all depends on how it rides.

fordem
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The Dobinsons are now supposedly in transit to Guyana

The Dobinsons springs arrived in Miami and were mailed to my sister where I picked them up and repackaged them and then dropped them off at the freight forwarder for shipment to Guyana - I'm now impatiently awaiting their arrival here - I did briefly consider packing them in my luggage, but, the 23 lbs weight shown on the UPS shipping documents was actually 40 lbs and as I was already pushing the envelope I shipped them via ocean freight - so another two to three weeks.

On a different front - the starter on a GDI engined iO has to rank as one of the most difficult to remove - you can either go from below and remove drive shaft and cross-member plus a host of other bits & pieces, or go from above and remove the intake and a host of other bits & pieces - the only good part is that the solenoid died in the drive way and not in the trail we were about to leave for - that would have required a flatbed to recover the car and get it back to town - strike one black mark for automatic transmissions in 4WDs.

fordem
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After many months ...

My Dobinsons springs have finally made to Guyana

 

On the right, C43-240 front springs; on the left, C43-115 rear springs - yes, the fronts are right/left and the rears left/right.

 

The front springs alongside an old set of OEM Mitsubishi "low pan" springs.

Next weekend should be a three day weekend, so I guess that is when I'll be installing them - give myself enough time to remove & reinstall the front springs with both low & high pan struts and with/without strut extenders to find the optimum configuration - hopefully I won't have to go back to Dobinsons to resolve any reide height issues.

Claude io
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lift

I thought that you will never lift that io....what took you so long wink

Happy io....soon anyway !

fordem
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Plans (and needs) change Claude ;)

I've installed the Dobinsons springs - did the rears yesterday afternoon when I got home from work, and the fronts today, I also fitted new strut boots.

What we have currently are C43-240 springs with the existing KYB low pan struts in front, and C43-115 springs with the existing Monroe Adventure D7002 shocks in back.

I took a short test drive yesterday evening with just the rear springs fitted and immediately got the feeling that the rear end was underdamped, especially on the rebound, something that was not entirely unexpected - I may swap the Monroes out for KYBs.  After the front springs went in I took a slightly longer test drive, the car felt much more balanced with no trace of the struts topping out on speed bumps, which had been a concern.

Eyeballing it, the camber looks good, I'll probably take it in for an alignment on Monday, see whether or not I need to fit camber bolts, but more because I suspect the toe will be out after the lift and incorrect toe can do a number on the tires in a relatively short distance, and then drive it "as-is" for a few weeks - see if it settles, see how I feel about the ride, and also figure out what to do with regard the installation of the KYB high pan struts - one option being to ask Dobinsons about a different spring with less lift.

At this point I'm fairly happy with it, that may change when I start looking for tires as I would like to go to a slightly larger tire - maybe a 225/75R16, which will require the high pan struts.

I'll post the before & after numbers later - the install sheet is in the car and I'm too lazy to get it - from memory the front came up just about 30mm, and the rear, which should have been 35mm was closer to 60.

fordem
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I figured it out ...

After a couple of days and a couple of hundred kilometers, I remeasured the height, which hasn't changed, and then realized there's only 10mm difference in height between the right & left rear corners, so it's not that the right rear has been lifted by 60mm as much as the entire right side of the car was stitting close to 10mm lower than the left, and that has now been corrected.

Before - LF:657mm, RF:649mm, LR:674mm, RR:666mm

After    - LF:690mm, RF:686mm, LR:715mm, RR:725mm

Claude io
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new lift

That seems to be a good level. That probably giving you a good handling. 

Happy io

simmo777
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At last a lift!

Good to see you finally got your hands on some springs and lift!

Eager to hear your comments after some more driving.

Any pictures of before and after?

2002 5dr Pajero IO QA 2.0L Auto - Lifted, Locked!! 1.925 Low Range - Muddies (205/80/16) - Redback Extractors to 200cell cat to dump at diff Exhaust 

fordem
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Handling is actually pretty good...

The OE spings on the iO are just way too soft - with the new springs, body roll in a turn is vastly reduced, as is the "nose dive" that was very noticeable under braking - my one concern at this point is the damping or what appears to be a lack thereof, especially noticeable when coming off a speed bump - as much as I want a shock with adjustable rebound damping, I don't know that I'm willing to spring for a set of Konis

Claude io
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lift

If I understood you still have the original strut, maybe changing them will help ? The KYB strut do not stay at 100% for very long. 

Could also be a good idea to "play" with tyre pressure....

Happy io

fordem
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I'd say the struts are in reasonable shape...

One of the first things to go when a strut fails is the gas charge, these had no trouble staying extended during the installation of the springs.

I do have a pair of new struts, but they are high pan and as you know, those are likely to create their own set of issues.

fordem
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I had the car aligned today...

Prior to the lift installation I had noticed that there was once again some amount of negative camber on the front tires which disappeared when I installed the springs - when we put the car up on the rack it was surprisingly enough still within spec. on caster & camber, and just barely out on the toe - which has now been corrected.

I find I'm enjoying the ride more & more, and beginning to think these are the springs Mitsubishi should have used from the get go.

I still haven't decided how to approach the high pan/low pan issue, it's very clear that the Dobinsons were designed for the low pan struts, and whilst I want the additional clearance that the high pan struts can provide, I'm not keen of lifting any higher (other than the minimal lift the larger tire will provide), or reducing the suspension droop any further.

I think I'll start a discussion with the good folks at Dobinsons and see if they are interested/willing to do another spring with the same rate but less lift, failing which I can consider their "standard height" front spring.

 

.

bob_oz
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dobinsons for high pan

fordem wrote:

Prior to the lift installation I had noticed that there was once again some amount of negative camber on the front tires which disappeared when I installed the springs - when we put the car up on the rack it was surprisingly enough still within spec. on caster & camber, and just barely out on the toe - which has now been corrected.

I find I'm enjoying the ride more & more, and beginning to think these are the springs Mitsubishi should have used from the get go.

I still haven't decided how to approach the high pan/low pan issue, it's very clear that the Dobinsons were designed for the low pan struts, and whilst I want the additional clearance that the high pan struts can provide, I'm not keen of lifting any higher (other than the minimal lift the larger tire will provide), or reducing the suspension droop any further.

I think I'll start a discussion with the good folks at Dobinsons and see if they are interested/willing to do another spring with the same rate but less lift, failing which I can consider their "standard height" front spring.

they make them - same part number but with some letters at the end of the number

.

Claude io
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before & after - sort of...

 

I had to go up to the local Caterpillar agents today, so I took this opportunity to get a side by side, sort of before & after shot, of my car along side a standard ride height iO - both cars are wearing the same size rubber, but mine (on the right of the picture) has more room in the arches.  Something else I observed is that my car has noticeably more "rake" or "front to back" slope (front is lower) - this makes me more inclined to lift the front a further 25mm, by fitting the pair of high pan struts that I have sitting on a shelf.  I fully expect this to cause the struts to "top out", also on the shelf are a pair of strut rod extenders made to deal with that scenario.

I've also decided that the time has come to deal with the erratic & frequently excessive oil consumption, now that I have successfully dealt with the leaks, it is obvious that the oil that is being used is being burned, and it really is too much to be the valve seals, so it's more than likely the oil control rings.  By the end of this month I will have acquired all the parts that can be purchased for a rebuild without actually tearing the engine apart, I know where to source the required bearings locally, but will most likely need to special order the pistons, if a rebore is deemed necessary - for some strange reason, rings are available locally, but not pistons.

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